Wednesday, 14 July 2010

IT gender pay gap getting worse

Skills Survey 2009: Female techies not pocketing the biggest bonuses either...

The IT gender pay gap is getting worse, according to results from the 2009 silicon.com Skills Survey.

More than a third (35 per cent) of female IT workers responding to this year's survey said they were on the bottom rung of the tech pay ladder, earning less than £25k, compared to just under a third of women (32 per cent) last year. And only 14 per cent of male IT workers are in the lowest pay bracket this year, down from 20 per cent in 2008.

A slightly larger proportion of women than men also take home the second lowest pay packet, of between £25,001 to £40k: 27.5 per cent of women versus 25.5 per cent of men. However when it comes to earnings of more than £40,001, men consistently dominate - and in the highest pay brackets the proportion of men to women is more than double.


Image credit: Natasha Lomas/silicon.com
Nearly a quarter (23 per cent) of male respondents reported earning £40,001 to £55k this year, compared to less than a fifth (17.5 per cent) of female respondents; while 17 per cent of male respondents reported earning £55,001 to £70k, versus just 12.5 per cent of women. In the top two earnings brackets there is a significant hike in the proportion of men versus women: 15 per cent of male respondents reported earning £70,001 to £110k this year, compared to just five per cent of women; while 5.5 per cent of men claimed to pocket £110,001+, only 2.5 per cent of women did.

When it comes to bonuses, while a larger proportion of female techies reported getting a bonus this year than male techies (42.5 per cent of women versus 35 per cent of men) - a change on last year when the sexes were equally likely to get extra cash - men tended to take home bigger bonuses than women.

The majority of female bonuses this year fall in the less-than-£5k category: 65 per cent of female respondents, versus 47 per cent of men.

For bigger bonuses men were the clear winners: no female IT workers responding to the survey reported receiving a bonus of more than £20,001, yet 10 per cent of male respondents took home the biggest bucks - including one per cent that reported getting a bonus of more than £100k. And while 43 per cent of men reported a bonus of between £5,001 and £20k, only 35 per cent of women did so.

In April this year the government published the Equality Bill which includes measures to strengthen the law on pay equality in the public sector. According to the latest figures from the Office for National Statistics, women still earn on average 22 per cent less per hour than men - a marginal improvement on last year when the gap stood at 22.5 per cent.

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  1. 1. anonymous

    Statistics. All this proves is that the women spend more time filling in questionaires whilst the men ignore them as they are not very interested. I constantly see more and more females being promoted up the ladder to balance out but a lot are promoted above thier ability and then make a mess of things making it more difficult for women to shine in the future. Promotions should be on talent alone and no other reason and stats like these should be complied properly.


  2. 2. anonymous

    While I don't necessarily agree with the previous poster, these stats prove nothing. We don't know the ages of the respondents, how many women choose to leave the profession early to do other things (leaving perhaps more in junior posts), or even if it was a statistically fair sample.

    For example we have few female techies but several female ex techies in senior positions

    So a good start a debate, but there is nothing here that can be relied upon to provide any real information.


    • 3. blogger123

      Most statistics are made up.


      • 4. NLondon

        Latest figures from the Office for National Statistics show women still earn on average 22 per cent less per hour than men.

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